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A cross-sectional study to evaluate depression and quality of life among patients with lymphoedema due to podoconiosis, lymphatic filariasis and leprosy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Podoconiosis, lymphatic filariasis (LF) and leprosy are neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) that cause lymphoedema. When left untreated, they lead to substantial disability. This study determined the quality of life (QOL) and depression associated with lymphoedema in patients with podoconiosis, LF and leprosy. The study was conducted in northwestern Ethiopia.

METHODS: This baseline cross-sectional study, nested within an interventional, non-comparative, longitudinal study, included patients with lymphoedema. Depression and QOL were assessed using versions of the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire and Dermatologic Life Quality Index (DLQI), respectively, that had been translated into Amharic and validated. Factors associated with depression and QOL were assessed using multivariate linear regression analysis.

RESULTS: Of the 251 patients with lymphoedema included in the study, 119 (47.4%) had moderate to severe depression and overall QOL was poor (mean±standard deviation [SD] DLQI score: 11.4±4.2). Disability was significantly associated with depression (β=0.26 [95% confidence interval {CI} 0.19 to 0.33]). Currently receiving treatment (β=-3.05 [95% CI -5.25 to -0.85), disability (β=-0.08 [95% CI -0.15 to -0.01]) and social support (moderate support: β=-2.27 [95% CI -3.66 to -0.89] and strong support: β=-2.87 [95% CI -5.35 to -0.38]) were significantly associated with better QOL.

CONCLUSION: High levels of depression and low QOL were found among patients with lymphoedema due the three NTDs in Ethiopia.

More information

Type
Journal Article
Author
Ali O
Deribe K
Semrau M
Mengiste A
Kinfe M
Tesfaye A
Bremner S
Davey G
Fekadu A
Year of Publication
2020
Journal
Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Date Published
11/2020
Language
eng
ISSN Number
1878-3503
DOI
10.1093/trstmh/traa130
Alternate Journal
Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg
PMID
33190154
Publication Language
eng