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Serious adverse reactions associated with ivermectin: A systematic pharmacovigilance study in sub-Saharan Africa and in the rest of the World.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Ivermectin is known to cause severe encephalopathies in subjects infected with loiasis, an endemic parasite in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). In addition, case reports have described ivermectin-related serious adverse drug reactions (sADRs) such as toxidermias, hepatic and renal disorders. The aim of this study was to identify suspected sADRs reported after ivermectin administration in VigiBase, the World Health Organization's global individual case safety reports database and analyze their frequency relative to the frequency of these events after other antinematodal drugs reported in SSA and other areas of the world (ROW).

METHODS: All antinematodal-related sADRs were extracted from VigiBase. Disproportionality analyses were conducted to investigate nervous, cutaneous, psychiatric, respiratory, renal, hepatic and cardiac suspected sADRs reported after ivermectin and benzimidazole drug administration across the world, in SSA and RoW.

PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 2041 post-ivermectin or post-benzimidazole suspected sADRs were identified including 667 after ivermectin exposure (208 in SSA and 459 in the RoW). We found an increased reporting for toxidermias, encephalopathies, confusional disorders after ivermectin compared to benzimidazole drug administration. Encephalopathies were not only reported from SSA but also from the RoW (adjusted reporting odds ratios [aROR] 6.30, 95% confidence interval: 2.68-14.8), highlighting the fact these types of sADR occur outside loiasis endemic regions.

CONCLUSION: We described for the first time suspected sADRs associated with ivermectin exposure according to geographical origin. While our results do not put in question ivermectin's excellent safety profile, they show that as for all drugs, appropriate pharmacovigilance for adverse reactions is indicated.

More information

Type
Journal Article
Author
Campillo J
Boussinesq M
Bertout S
Faillie J
Chesnais C
Year of Publication
2021
Journal
PLoS neglected tropical diseases
Volume
15
Issue
4
Number of Pages
e0009354
Date Published
04/2021
Language
eng
ISSN Number
1935-2735
DOI
10.1371/journal.pntd.0009354
Alternate Journal
PLoS Negl Trop Dis
PMID
33878105
Publication Language
eng